Programs & Services

Peruvian Printmakers Collaborate with Local Artists to Create Mural at Museum

June 2nd, 2018

(Santa Fe, New Mexico) – This month, the Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) welcomes a group of socially engaged artists from Lima Peru who will collaborate with local artists to create works that bridge North and South America. Carol Fernandez and Fernando Castro, founders of the screen printing collective Amapolay will be in Santa Fe from June 25 through July first. Amapolay will be collaborating with local print makers to create works around shared issues across international borders.

The weeklong collaboration culminates in two public events. The Museum is joining with AMP Concerts to present a celebration of Lima’s street music, art, and food in in the Santa Fe Railyard on the evening of Friday, June 30. The day includes a free concert by La Chamba, a Peruvian chicha style band from Los Angeles. The Museum will also provide tables set up with live screen printing with the artists, and a pop up art market.

On Sunday, July 1, the Museum will provide artist talks, live screen printing and mobile mural painting.

Saturday, June 30, at the Santa Fe Railyard



  • Starting at 6 p.m.: Live screen printing with Amapolay from Peru and local artists Jamison Chas Banks, Heidi Brandow, Moira Garcia, Manuel Ramirez, members of the Alas de Agua collective, and Baca Print Shop. Paper provided, bring your own T-shirts or bandanas.

  • 7 p.m.: Free concert with La Chamba from Los Angeles

  • Pop up artist market

  • Food Trucks: Sabor Peruano, Kebab Caravan, Freezie Fresh Ice Cream

Sunday, July 1, 2018, at the Museum of International Folk Art



  • 1-2 p.m.: artist talks

  • 2-4 p.m.: Live screen printing with Amapolay from Peru and local artists Jamison Chas Banks, Heidi Brandow, Moira Garcia, Manuel Ramirez, members of the Alas de Agua collective, and Baca Print Shop. Paper provided, bring your own T-shirts or bandanas.

  • Pop up artist market

Amapolay is an artist collective in the gráfica popular tradition headed by Carol Fernandez and Fernando Castro. Using screen printing and hand lettering as their medium, Amapolay creates posters, t-shirts, and stickers to raise awareness and promote solidarity among internal migrant populations in Lima. The city of Lima has grown exponentially, especially with displacement of communities from rural areas during the years of the Internal Armed Conflict. Often living in shantytowns and other marginalized areas of the city, these communities face economic, cultural and racial discrimination.  Through workshops and street fairs, Amapolay works to elevate pride among immigrant youth in Lima and promote the unique culture that mixes rural heritage with urban life.

Amapolay will be collaborating with local artists: Jamison Chas Banks, Heidi Brandow, Moira Garcia, Manuel Ramirez, John Santos, and members of the Alas de Agua collective.

The events are funded by the International Folk Art Foundation and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation Director’s Leadership Fund, AMP Concerts, New Mexico Culture Squared (NMC2).

 

Public Contact & Number:

Kathryn Risley 505-476-1203, Kathryn.risley@state.nm.us

 

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/ Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice. A division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200. Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. Events, news releases and images about activities at the Museum of International Folk Art and other divisions in the Department of Cultural Affairs can be accessed at www.media.newmexicoculture.org 

 

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2-MOIFA -Spanish Title: Somos Raiz  English Title: We are Roots

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