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Jemez Historic Site

Jemez Historic Site

The Jemez Indians established the Pueblo of Giusewa (pronounced Gee-say-wah) among the hot springs of Jemez Valley around AD
1350.

It was a multistory village which may have contained as many as 1,000 rooms. Giusewa was first visited by Spanish in 1541. Later, in 1598, Franciscan missionaries came to convert the Jemez People to Christianity. By 1621, the priests along with their Native American converts had constructed San José de los Jémez Mission. However, the missionary effort ultimately failed. Brought on by suppression of the Native religion and a devastating drought, the Jemez joined the Pueblo Revolt on August 10, 1680. This culminated in the removal of the Spanish from northern New Mexico for the next 12 years.

The San José de los Jémez Mission, built in the Western Baroque style, rises at Giusewa with massive eight-foot-thick stone walls. An interpretive trail winds through the majestic site. An exhibition in the Visitor’s Center presents the history and culture of the Jemez People in their own words. Lodging and food are available in Jemez Springs.

New Mexico CulturePass

Your ticket to 15 exceptional Museums and Historic Sites. From Indian treasures to space exploration, world-class folk art to awesome dinosaurs—our museums and monuments celebrate the essence of New Mexico every day.
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Featured DCA Exhibitions

Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico

This exhibition traces Flamenco from its beginnings as a folkloric art form among the Gypsy people of southern Spain to its rise as an international art form enjoyed by millions. The exhibition features costumes, play bills, instruments, and paintings, complemented by lectures, workshops and performances.
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No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art

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Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art

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The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert "Shoofly" Shufelt

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.
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