Exhibit | New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs
Programs & Services

Sewing Stories of Displacement

On display through Mar 28, 2021 at the Museum of International Folk Art

Throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, moments of violence, political upheaval, and natural disaster have led to the displacement of entire communities. Since the 1960s, displaced people throughout the world—women, men, and children—have embroidered the stories of their forced migrations, new transitions, and memories of more stable lives. Through these textiles, they have been able to document their experiences, share their perspectives, and often, supplement their income during desperate times.

 

The Train Station, 1979. This gabba, chain-stitched embroidery on felted wool, illustrates the forced migration of Kahuta residents after the area became a site for the national atomic bomb project in 1976. Unknown artist, Pakistan. MOIFA, IFAF Collection, FA.1985.464.13.

Also on exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art


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