Programs & Services

El Camino Real Historic Trail Site

Explore the first European road in North America

El Camino Real Historic Trail Site

El Camino Real Historic Site is temporarily closed. Please check back for reopening information.

El Camino Real Historic Trail Site is a state-of-the-art facility that rises from the wild desert, as different from its environment as from the other New Mexico historic sites. Presenting the history of exchange between Mexico, Europe, and America, this site functions as a conduit for deeper anthropological understanding.

The historic site presents exhibitions about a historic corridor of trade between cultures of ideas, families, materials, philosophies, and faiths. The road originated as a trade route centuries before the Spanish named it El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the Royal Road of the Interior, and laid claim to the first European road in America.

New Mexico CulturePass

Your ticket to 15 exceptional Museums and Historic Sites. From Indian treasures to space exploration, world-class folk art to awesome dinosaurs—our museums and monuments celebrate the essence of New Mexico every day.
More Info »

Featured DCA Exhibitions

New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.
more »

What's the Buzz? Why Honey Bees Matter

This exhibit explores the amazing history of humans keeping honey bees for food and other bee products and the critical role bees play in pollinating about a third of the plants we ultimately consume as our food.
more »

Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time

During 2007 and 2008, flying at alarmingly low altitudes and slow speeds,photographer Adriel Heisey leaned out the door of his light plane, and holding his camera with both hands, re-photographed some of the Southwest’s most significant archaeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his new bride Anne photographed in 1929.
more »

Generations

The Museum's first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico.
more »